If you get an offer from two big companies and you decline and choose another offer, do you get black listed?

Say you’ve landed a job – not with just one, but two big companies. It wasn’t easy – you had to beat some pretty tough competition on the way for both those positions! Now comes the decision that will shape your career – which dream job do you choose?

The factors will be many. It may be the opportunity to grow, the work is your passion, the workplace – location, culture, employees and values or just the pay/perks that impact your final decision. At times, making a choice can be really hard and you might want to keep your options open at the other company even after you’ve chosen one of the two. It’s natural then, to wonder how the other company would take it. Concerns about being blacklisted are obviously understandable. If you ever find yourself in a situation as this, here’s what you need to know – the truth is exactly the opposite of what you believe.

Recruiters don’t blacklist you for choosing what you deem a better deal. Rather, you are considered a potential future employee. Here’s how you can deal with such scenarios:

  • Politely turn down the offer you’re rejecting. Send an email to the recruiter explaining why you are turning down the position and how you might still want to work for the company in the future. If possible, have a friendly phone conversation as well!

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  • Express your gratitude for the offer and convey your appreciation for the recruiter’s consideration through the hiring process. If the recruiter wants to stay in contact, let them know you’re open to it. Make sure you tell them that you value all the time and effort they put in helping you through the interview process.
  • You can also negotiate for a better offer if it’s the pay/perks that makes you prefer the other option. Be polite during the negotiations and convey clearly how you feel the pay/perks are less for the value you’d bring in to the business. Employers are almost invariably open to negotiations regarding pay/perks.

After you’ve made a decision and joined one of the two companies, don’t talk ill of the other company. It’s never a good idea to trash talk another company, especially if it’s your company’s competitor. You might be invited to the other company’s social events meant to keep potential employees in the fold. Attend such events only if you are sure it wouldn’t create ethical conflicts with regards to your job or the aims/goals of your company.

It’s generally not advisable to participate in such gatherings if your company is a direct competitor. In the event you do participate, never give out sensitive information about the nature of your work or your company. It’s alright to keep in touch with recruiters over email, phone or professional networks such as LinkedIn. Recruiters might check on you every once in a while to keep in touch and to potentially recruit you if you are available. Be warm, polite and keep the connections alive.

  • If for any reason you don’t like the job you’ve joined, check in with the other company’s recruiter to find out if the position you landed is still available.
  • If you can get back to the other company, make sure you have a good reason for quitting your present job. Frequently changing jobs is frowned upon in general. It is considered as a sign of unreliability.
  • Just like anything else in life, once you make an informed decision–trust your decision and stick with it. Especially in the job market, where you need to be practical and learn all that your current company has to offer before sending in that resignation letter.
  • Explain to your employer why you are quitting the job and convince the other company you’d not quit anytime soon as you switch jobs. Again, don’t divulge sensitive information pertaining to your previous stint.

Though, all this can be avoided if you research the company, its culture and all pertinent factors before you choose to join. If you’re looking for a job right now and you don’t have the job offer you’ve always wanted yet, apply online at IIMJobs.com for some great offers and opportunities!

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